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Videos uploaded by user “ppcian”
How To Invest $1000 (Investing $1000 For Dividends)
 
12:08
How would I invest $1000? If I were just starting out again and had one thousand dollars to invest in the stock market, what would I do? Well, being PPC Ian and being a dividend growth investor, I would personally approach this investment dividend growth style. In today's video, I will approach this hypothetical question, and will share the 9 rules that would govern my $1000 initial investment, paving the way for a future of successful investing and personal finance: (1) I would purchase one stock. That's right, I would not diversify, but I would rather stay focused. (2) I would purchase that one stock in a dividend reinvestment plan or DRIP for short. I would choose a DRIP that has no fees or low fees. (3) II would make a lump sum investment. Meaning: I would avoid dollar cost averaging the initial one thousand dollars, and would just get my money working for me right away. (4) I would make sure to reinvest all dividends. Dividend reinvestment plans (see rule 2) make this easy. In selecting my stock and DRIP, I would want to make sure that there are no (or very minimal fees) for dividend reinvestment. (5) I would make ongoing period investments of $25 or $50 once I have more cash (after my initial $1000 stock investment). (6) I would target a blue chip stock, one that has been around forever and one that will continue to be around forever. This would provide stability and also a level of diversification. (7) I would target 7% year-over-year growth in the dividend, over the long term. I'd look for consistent dividend growth. (8) I would target a company with a payout ratio in the 50% range. (9) Last, I would target a stock with a current dividend yield in the 3% range. This strategy has the opportunity to deliver superb rules, when factoring in dividend growth, dividend reinvestment, and capital appreciation. That said, let's look at this from a conservative modeling perspective. Let's assume zero capital appreciation and no reinvested dividends. In that case, one would yield 23% on their initial investment after 30 years. Meaning, after 30 years, one would take home $230 in cash every single year from their $1000 investment. And, that's the conservative model. I hope you enjoyed this hypothetical situation that shows what I would personally do in this situation. Want to learn more? Following are some of my additional resources about dividend growth investing. Here's my video about dividend reinvestment plans: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0LySUgHwUU Here's my video about buying stock with no fees with as low as $25: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWdptrcEKGo Here's my video about starting yield, and why it doesn't matter. It's all about dividend growth: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8zdEaSrWmNQ Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions.
Views: 28884 ppcian
Dividend Growth Investing: How To Yield 20+% On Cost
 
09:02
As a dividend growth investor, I'm obsessed with dividends and cash flow. I invest to receive a growing stream of dividends over time. Within dividend growth investing (and personal finance overall), I believe yield on cost is one of the most underrated metrics around. Learn how the patience, persistence, and simple math can drive a 20+% yield on cost in your portfolio. Learn how a long-term approach could help you achieve your financial and life dreams. http://www.ppcian.com Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions.
Views: 15322 ppcian
Dividend Stocks Vs. Dividend ETFs (Exchange Traded Funds)
 
15:33
You like dividend checks. However, you are unsure whether you should pursue individual dividend-paying stocks or dividend-focused ETFs (exchange traded funds). Today's video, a response to a subscriber question, compares and contrasts individual dividend growth stocks versus dividend mutual funds (ETFs), through my personal lens. While I cannot answer this question for others, I can share my personal pros and cons when I compare the two, and how I decided to proceed in my personal stock portfolio. Specifically, I cover: * Two specific ETF (exchange traded fund) examples from a major ETF mutual fund family. * Why starting yields may be a bit too low with ETFs. * Why I love the control that individual, dividend stocks offer. (And, their lack of ongoing fees is nice too.) * How one can derive more value (when stocks are "on sale") via individual stocks versus mutual funds (which offer a basket of stocks). This is a critical point. The stock market, in my opinion, is not efficient. By holding individual dividend stocks, I get to buy bargains all the time. * When ETFs and mutual funds may make sense (namely retirement accounts where individual stocks are not an option, or those that have smaller portfolios without the prospect of large-scale growth). * How I hope and dream that everyone watching has a million dollar (or more) dividend stock portfolio, one that pays massive cash flow. Today's video is a bit contrarian, and that's ok. My goal is one of early financial freedom and massive passive income. Since my goals are a bit unconventional, my personal finance strategy has been a bit unconventional too. Learn more about dividend stock brokers: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcuXZauMwZk Learn more about individual vs. retirement accounts (for someone seeking early financial independence): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_MqPhKoH90 Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 22948 ppcian
Dividend Investing: 3 Success Strategies
 
09:24
As a dividend investor for as long as I can remember, I am obsessed with passive income and cash flow. My goal is driving sufficient dividend income from my stock portfolio to cover all living expenses. As someone who has seen the dividend snowball take effect, I want to share three success strategies today that have personally helped me. You will not get rich overnight with dividend investing. In fact, you will likely not see meaningful, life-changing income for ten years. It's those first ten years that can be the most difficult. These three tips today are geared towards the dividend investor in his/her first ten years. I hope you enjoy my tips about: 1) Taking baby steps 2) Leveraging the power of paper statements 3) Tracking dividends and not portfolio value Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions.
Views: 11213 ppcian
How To Analyze Dividend Stocks - Financial Freedom and Cash Flow (Part 1)
 
24:56
You want to invest in dividend-paying stocks for cash flow and passive income. You want to build a dividend stock portfolio, one that features a growing stream of passive income over time. However, you don't know how to analyze stocks to determine if they are a good fit for your portfolio. Today's video features my personal strategy on how I analyze stocks. While I originally wanted to film a long, multi-hour video on dividend stock analysis, I figured it would be more practical for me (and you) to film several shorter videos. Today's video is the first in this series, a long-time subscriber request! The first step of analyzing a dividend stock is actually determining if it belongs on your watch list at all. Today's video covers the basics, my first seven filters: 1) Have I heard of the company? Do I use their goods and/or services? Do I have extensive experience with the company, and believe in their bright future? 2) What is the company's market capitalization? Does it fit into my sweet spot? 3) What is the current dividend yield? Does it match my strategy? 4) What is the dividend payout ratio? Is it sustainable? 5) What is the current price per share? Is the stock selling at a 52-week high, or is it "on sale"? 6) What is the PE ratio? Does it fall into my desired range? 7) What is the dividend history? Has the company increased dividends over time? If so, what is the annual rate of increase? Does it fall into my desired range? I recently added to my Kimberly-Clark (KMB) position. In today's video, I go through my stock analysis filters with KMB as the example. As a related video, here's how I personally source new stocks for my portfolio: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvBgUv-TmlA Disclosure: I am long Kimberly-Clark (KMB) stock. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 14824 ppcian
Dividend Investing: Five Horrible MISTAKES To Avoid (Invest For Dividends)
 
18:59
Want to invest in the stock market for dividends and cash flow? Learn from my personal mistakes (and triumphs too). In the world of investing, it's not only about what you do right. It's about avoiding mistakes too. Today, I'm excited to highlight five common mistakes that dividend growth investors should avoid: (1) The Dreaded Yield Trap: A yield trap is a dividend stock with a very high, yet unsustainable, current yield. These stocks can often attract investors with the promise of a great dividend. However, they are too good to be true. It's important to avoid yield traps. And, focus on companies with sustainable, yet growing, dividends. (2) Not Starting Now: Time is your greatest asset in the world of dividend investing. It's all about compound interest. In today's video, I tell the story of two investors. One invests $5,000 and has 30 years of investing ahead of them. One waits ten years and invests $10,000, with only 20 years of investing ahead of them. Both do really well, but guess what? They both end up in the same place. Wait 10 years, and you may have to invest twice as much! It's all about starting now. (3) Getting Bored and Giving Up: Dividend growth investing is a super investing strategy. That said, it is not exciting like trading. Slow and steady. Building a large stream of dividend income takes years, decades even. It's easy to get bored, give up, and potentially cash out (or switch strategies). Don't do it! (4) Not Controlling Your Budget: Dividend investing is a means to financial freedom. Meaning, passive income can cover one's living expenses, giving them complete flexibility in life. Amazing! That being said, financial freedom is quite unlikely if one's budget is out of control. If one spends 90% of their income and saves only 10%, it's going to be very difficult to one day live off dividend income. (That said 10% is certainly a great start, and a step in the right direction!) Learn why at least 30% savings is key for dividend investors. (5) Following The Crowd: A big mistake in the world of dividends is following the crowd. Because this personal finance strategy requires persistence and dedication, one has to have conviction in their stock selections. One has to stand by their selections in good times and bad. When you follow the crowd, in my opinion, you will never have sufficient conviction in your portfolio. Choose your own stocks and stand by them! Want to learn about even more investing mistakes (to avoid)? You may want to check out my other video about dividend investing mistakes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qh37UNsS_wc Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions.
Views: 29956 ppcian
How To Invest $25 Per Month With No Fees (Investing In Stocks For Dividends)
 
11:33
When you buy stock directly from a company (through a transfer agent such as Computershare), you have the opportunity to purchase stock with no fees. Especially when you are investing lower amounts (such as $25 each month) and averaging in over time, it's possible to minimize or even eliminate fees. Learn how it is possible for smaller dividend growth investors to average into dividend stock ownership with zero fees. While it's more difficult to minimize or eliminate fees than 5 or 10 years ago, it still is possible. You just need to know the right places to look. Learn about DRIPs (Dividend Reinvestment Plans), transfer agents, averaging in, and the philosophy behind small, incremental investments in dividend-paying companies. Learn how even the smallest investors can get ahead buying stock directly. Disclosure: I used to own Exxon Mobil (Ticker: XOM) but sold my position. I do not own Abbvie (Ticker: ABBV) but might initiative a position at some point. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions.
Views: 9941 ppcian
Dividend Investing: Is PE Ratio The Most Important Metric?
 
15:16
In the world of dividend growth investing, PE ratio is a very important metric. Managing a stock portfolio with over 30 positions can be complex. When deploying new capital, it's sometimes unclear which stock presents the best current value. PE ratio (price divided by earnings for the trailing 12 months) is a favorite metric for finding value in dividend stocks. With the goal of early financial freedom, I'm all about buying stocks that are "on sale" providing the best value. Today's video, a response to a subscriber question, discusses the price earnings ratio from a variety of perspectives. In particular, I cover: * What is a PE ratio (the price earnings ratio)? * What is the difference between a backward-looking (trailing 12 months) PE ratio and a forward-looking PE ratio? Why do I personally prefer the trailing 12 months (backward-looking) PE? * How do PE ratios vary by sector? * How do PE ratios vary by market (bull market vs. bear market)? * What are acceptable ranges of PE ratios by sector for my personal portfolio? (Where is the "buy zone" by sector?) * Sectors covered include: utilities, consumer non-cyclical, industrials, healthcare, restaurants, financial, energy, technology, and retail. * Learn why PE ratio does not apply to real estate investment trusts (REITs). In my dividend growth stock portfolio, I analyze PE ratio perhaps more than any other metric. Thanks for the great question, and please keep them coming! Subscriber questions fuel the content of this channel. Disclosure: I am long Starbucks (SBUX). Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 7262 ppcian
Investing In REITs For Dividends (Pros & Cons of Real Estate Investment Trusts)
 
16:15
Are you considering an investment in REITs (or Real Estate Investment Trusts) for dividends and cash flow? I personally own only one REIT in my dividend portfolio and consider my REIT an ancillary (non-core) position. That being said, I am in a unique situation because I work in the real estate industry and own a home (I am already over-weighted, at a high level, in the real estate industry). A subscriber question, today's video goes into a multitude of pros, cons, and factors to consider about investing in real estate investment trusts for dividend income. * Do you work in the real estate industry? Do you already own a home? Do you own physical real estate investments? If so, those are all factors worth considering when contemplating REITs for one’s dividend portfolio. When looking at diversification, I don't only look at my portfolio. I look at all factors in my life. If the real estate industry tanks, I don't want to get hit on the job front, the home front, and the portfolio front all at once! * Real estate investment trusts carry important tax considerations. As pass through entities, they avoid double taxation (and are required to distribute most of their earnings). That said, the shareowner has to pay ordinary income on dividends (as compared to long term capital gains on qualified dividends of most corporations). Long story short, the tax rate on dividends from REITs is higher than your typical dividend-paying corporation. Moreover, reporting REIT dividends on one's tax return can be complicated (the distributions sometimes involve ordinary income and return of capital). Learn why it's important to weigh tax considerations when investing in real estate investment trusts for dividends and cash flow. * Since some REITs pay dividends on a monthly basis, they can help you stay in the game. Those monthly dividend checks are great for reinvesting and building one’s portfolio. A subscriber insight, I really love this idea! * Interest rates are really low right now. As interest rates rise, some REITs may face challenges securing (affordable) capital to do deals. This could affect short-term and future prospects. * The retail industry is going through a lot of change. When investing in REITs, it's a wise idea to understand exposure to retail. * Sometimes, one can experience superior results by investing in real estate directly. It may be more effective to invest in rental properties than going the REIT route. That said, real estate investment trusts are easier since one does not have to actively manage the real estate assets. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 49117 ppcian
Dividend Investing: Is It TOO Late?
 
15:45
A subscriber recently asked if it’s too late to get started in dividend growth investing. I had the good fortune to start early, and have had over 20 years of investing experience. My passive income portfolio contains over 30 dividend stocks. However, what if that were not the case? What if I were just getting started in my 30s or 40s? Would I be discouraged? Absolutely not! In my opinion, especially with longer life expectancies, getting started in ones 30s or 40s is not very late at all. These are still young, youthful years, a perfect time to get started in dividend stocks. It's an amazing time to start investing! Today's video covers: * Specific strategies that may make sense for those getting a later start. * Why (drastic) budget cuts are key for those starting late. * The importance of the ratio between one's take home pay and savings. * Why earning extra money (on the margin) can make all the difference in accelerating one's cash flow. * Why it's key that absolutely no mistakes are made, when one is starting a little later. * While it's important to set realistic goals, one should not give up on there dreams. It's all about being scrappy! * Older investors have a unique advantage: The promise of double income. Does it make sense to leverage the potential of double income to accelerate dividend portfolio yield? * The importance of dollar cost averaging, both in bull markets and bear markets. * The importance of reinvesting dividends to accelerate returns. * How capital invested can make up for a less time in the market. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 4905 ppcian
Dividend Investing: How I Find Stocks (Selecting Dividend Stocks)
 
15:09
When you are building a dividend growth stock portfolio, two factors are most important: (1) Capital invested and (2) stock selection. Today's video features my personal strategy for sourcing brand new stocks for my dividend stock portfolio. When you watch my strategy on how I find stocks, please keep in mind that these sources of ideas are in descending order of priority for a reason. While all sources mentioned are great (and have been leveraged in my personal portfolio), those mentioned first are my favorites. You will learn about the following sources of new investment ideas: * The Peter Lynch / Warren Buffett strategy of going with household names and brands. * Seeing the brands your kids love. * Exploring dividend stock ideas on Yahoo! Finance. * Leveraging newspapers and magazines for helpful investing ideas. * Watching YouTube videos (like this one) and reading personal finance / dividend blogs. While there are many ways to source new dividend stock ideas (stocks that generate cash flow and passive income), these are some that I have personally leveraged the most. In addition, three other key takeaways from today's video also include: * Make all investment ideas your own. Only buy once you have personally done the research and have overwhelming conviction. Dividend investing is about the long term (10-30 years out), and you need to have conviction in your investment portfolio. Really "own" your decisions! * Always ask yourself, each time you are considering a new position, whether it's better to simply add to an existing position (vs. buy the new one). Whether you have one stock or thirty, ask yourself that question each time you invest capital. * Analysis is everything. Today's video only shows one how to get stocks on their watch list. Once something is on the watch list, then it's time to invest hours upon hours of due diligence. Don't confuse the idea generation side of things (today's video) with the analysis side of things (other videos). Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. PPC Ian Content is Copyright IJL Productions LLC
Views: 14543 ppcian
Dividend Cuts, Economic Recession, & PANIC: My Perspectives As A Dividend Stock Investor
 
19:10
I'm receiving questions about dividend stocks during the next downturn. Will dividend companies cut their dividends, directly impacting one's passive income and cash flow? Will dividend stocks hold up, or will the entire strategy unfold? Of course, I cannot predict the future, but I can speak to my personal beliefs based on 20+ years of investing and personal finance experience. Today's video covers a lot of ground: * It's more difficult to invest in dividend stocks (or any financial instrument) than it was in 2009-2013. Why? The stock market has rallied, and requires more caution and attention than ever before. A downturn (market correction could be coming). * Since I buy and hold forever with the goal of living off my dividend income, the underlying stock price does not mean much to me. In fact, I prefer if stock prices go down (as long as company fundamentals are solid). Why? My dollars will go further, I will get more dividends for the same investment, and I will reach financial freedom sooner. * I like it when stocks go "on sale". Most people, by contrast, get scared when stocks are on sale. It's important to cultivate the right personal finance mindset. * The best companies still manage to thrive and grow their dividends, during good economic times and bad. * GE recently cut their dividend. What does this mean? Will other dividend stocks follow suit? * In my experience, it's all about diversification in protecting one's dividend income. I personally own 30+ stocks. * Learn from my mistakes with BBL, and how I faced my own dividend cut. I'm not immune to mistakes. * Dividend paying stocks tend to fare better during a market downturn and recession. Related Video: How I'm Beating The S&P 500 Index With Dividend Stocks (and Achieving Substantial Yield On Cost) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rhvz8-0TDY Disclosure: I used to own BBL, but do not anymore. I do not own GE. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 5646 ppcian
Individual Vs. Retirement Accounts (Dividend Stock Investing & Early Retirement)
 
09:28
As a dividend stock investor who wants early retirement (also known as financial freedom), I highly favor individual (taxable) accounts for my stock portfolio. By contrast, retirement accounts (such as the Roth IRA and 401k) do not allow withdrawals before 65 years of age (unless one wants to pay a penalty). Since I plan to tap into my dividend income well before I'm 65 years old, I do not like retirement accounts for my personal situation. Today's video compares and contrasts taxable individual accounts vs. retirement accounts, from a dividend growth investing perspective. Topics covered include: * Types of stock brokerage accounts. Individual (also known as taxable), Roth IRA, and 401k. * Pros and cons of individual accounts vs. retirement accounts. * Why I love individual accounts for my dividend stock portfolio. * Why I love the concept of an early retirement (or financial freedom). Even if I don't retire early, I will surely tap into my massive cash flow. * Why Roth style accounts are the best from a tax standpoint (if one does not plan to utilize funds until a traditional post-65 retirement). * Why employer match (often in 401k accounts) is pure gold. * Why 401k accounts could be risky since future taxes (at time of withdrawal) are unknown. * Why mutual funds are a deal-breaker for me, except in the case of 401k employer match. * How account optimization is a balancing act. I hope you enjoy today's video and please subscribe for more videos about dividend growth investing. Today's video is a special one, set on the beautiful Ka'anapali Beach in Maui, Hawaii. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions.
Views: 7355 ppcian
4.17% Dividend Yield: I Won't Be Buying This Stock (And It's Not Even About The Numbers)
 
20:58
As a dividend growth investor, I count on my positions being around for a very long time. I'm talking about decades of dividend compounding and growth! Today's video is about a dividend stock that has been through a lot of change, Kraft Heinz (KHC). Backed by Warren Buffett and sporting a 4.17% dividend yield, this stock certainly gets a lot of coverage in the dividend and value investing community. Learn why I won't be buying! Today's video starts with some history. Did you know? I used to own Heinz, when it was a standalone public company. Back in 2013, Heinz was brought private by Warren Buffett and 3G Capital. Fast forward to 2015 and Buffet and 3G bring Heinz public again, this time as a merger with Kraft. The history gets a bit confusing, but is absolutely critical to my analysis and perspective on this company. In a nutshell: I completely dislike this type of activity. I'm a long term holder, and try to stay away from games of financial chess. They are counterproductive for long term investors, and do not create value for common stock holders, in my opinion. While most dividend investors aspire to invest in the same companies as Buffett, I'm happy to own companies that have no Berkshire Hathaway involvement. In fact, I regularly get questions asking why I own 37 stocks. This is precisely why! If one or two positions get taken out by private equity, I'm fine. However, if I only own 5 stocks and the same thing happens, my portfolio of dividend paying stocks would face some short term turmoil. I'm focused on passive income that can pay my bills. I do what it takes to keep that stream steady, reliable, and growing. In addition to covering my philosophy on reorganizations, buyouts, and mergers, I also include fundamental stock analysis of Kraft Heinz. Some elements covered include: * Dividend growth (it's quite impressive). * Revenue * EPS (or earnings per share) * US vs. international diversification * Market capitalization * Debt * More At the end of the day, I even faced challenges analyzing this company since it only has two years of operating history in its current form. It's just not for me! That said, I truly wish anyone involved in this stock all the success in the world! From a brand and fundamental perspective, I do like KHC. Some helpful links to other investing videos mentioned in today's video... Here's my analysis of General Mills, a position in my portfolio: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z12Ac83Nz0Q Here's an analysis of Dr Pepper Snapple, a company in my portfolio that recently faced a buyout (which I dislike): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcn8BlqYwUo Here are my thoughts on stock analysts (from a dividend investor's perspective): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81pWwzH991k Last, please reach out and connect with me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ianlopuch/ Disclosure: I am long General Mills (GIS). I own this stock in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Also, I'm not a tax advisor and today's video is NOT tax advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 24642 ppcian
How To Invest $10,000 Dollars For MASSIVE Dividends and Cash Flow
 
14:13
What if I were investing $10,000 dollars in the stock market? What if I were investing ten thousand dollars for the first time? Today's video is all about that hypothetical situation, from a dividend income, cash flow, and passive income perspective. Topics covered include: (1) I would divide my $10,000 dollars into four stocks (equal amounts in each). I would choose my stocks from the four following industries: consumer non-cyclical food and beverage, consumer non-cyclical basic needs, medical and pharmaceutical, and industrials. These are the industries that will be around forever, which is essential for dividend investing and compound interest. (2) I would leverage DRIPs for my ten thousand dollars, or dividend reinvestment plans. These plans would allow my dividends to buy fractional shares of stock (via reinvestment) for low (or even no) fees. Dividend reinvestment plans would be critical for my compound interest strategy. Eventually, I would want to live off the dividends, but in the short and medium term, I would reinvest the dividends. (Where dividend reinvestment plans did not exist, or carried higher fees, I would leverage a low cost stock broker.) (3) I would stagger four $2,500 lump sum investments over the course of 3 or 4 months. After 3 or 4 months, my $10,000 dollars would be fully invested. (4) While my immediate dividend income would be around $300 per year (a nice amount of dividends), I would avoid the temptation to spend that money. Rather, I would reinvest. (5) I would build up a cash buffer (or emergency fund) so that I didn't have the temptation to tap into my stock portfolio when times got rough and I was short on cash. Ten thousand dollars is a lot of money, and the temptation will be there to cash out when money gets tight. (6) I would periodically add money to my positions. I would add as much as possible to my stock portfolio over time, investing in those positions that had the greatest value at the time. (7) I would buy blue chip companies with my $10,000 investment, although I would diversify market capitalizations (market caps) from $10 billion up to several hundred billion. With this size of a portfolio, I like to start diversifying by market cap. (8) I would target companies that provide 5-7% dividend growth each year. (9) Last, I would target starting yields in the 2-3% range. When one invests $10,000 dollars for the first time, that is a big deal. We're talking about a lot of money here. This video highlights the main things that I would do differently with ten thousand than smaller amounts. This video builds on my other videos in the same series. My One Thousand Dollar Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iijz-5vGSh0 My Five Thousand Dollar Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Bp0TzQKRr0 Thirty years out, assuming a starting yield of 3% and a 7% rate of dividend growth over time, my initial $10,000 dollar investment would yield $2,300 a year in dividends. And, that's a conservative model since i don't look at capital appreciation nor reinvested dividends. On a conservative basis, I'm yielding a large amount that can pay some serious bills after 30 years. That's the power of starting with a larger amount of money and going the dividend growth route. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions.
Views: 86596 ppcian
General Dividend-Tastic Mills (I'm Buying This Dividend Stock)
 
27:17
I just bought a brand new stock in my dividend portfolio. This is the first net new position I have opened in a while, and it's a household brand name. It's also a dividend stock that's "on sale" right now. With a starting dividend yield of 4.36% and a PE ratio of 14.6, I just had to initiate a position in General Mills (GIS). The maker of Cheerios, Haagen-Dazs, and Annies, General Mills just announced a huge acquisition of pet food maker Blue Buffalo. Also, they warned that EPS growth would be short of analyst expectations in fiscal 2018. The stock has dropped in price, creating an attractive value in my opinion (for long-term dividend growth investors). Today's video is a fundamental analysis of General Mills stock, and why this dividend growth investor likes it so much! In particular, today's video covers: * Why I like consumer non-cyclical stocks for my dividend stock portfolio. * Why I like stocks that make household brands. (I like to invest Peter Lynch style.) * Why a starting yield of 4.36% is very strong in this market, for this type of company. * My hypothesis as to why General Mills has been trending down in price, and why it's "overdone" in my humble opinion. * My extensive fundamental analysis including metrics like: price history, revenue, profit, earnings per share (EPS), PE ratio, operating margin, dividend history, payout ratio, debt level, and more! * At the end of the day, General Mills is facing some challenges (not too dissimilar from other consumer non-cyclical stocks. Perhaps the challenges are a bit more pronounced with GIS, on the revenue growth side and profit side. That said, as a long-term investor with decades upon decades ahead, I am willing to wait! I like a good buying opportunity, and am placing my capital behind General Mills. More than anything, I feel strong about the starting dividend yield, and possibility for dividend growth ahead. While dividend growth may be slow (or even non-existent) in the next few years, I think it will be fabulous in the long-term. After all, General Mills has been paying a dividend for 118 years, according to their Annual Report (10-K). And, I'm willing to wait for massive growth because the starting yield is so attractive. Want to learn more about stock market analysts and how they can create buying opportunities? Here's a fun video on the topic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81pWwzH991k General Mills has a great PE ratio, compared to the overall stock market. Want to learn why PE ratio is so important in my dividend growth investing? Here's a video on that topic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUmgT75dBKI One of my greatest investing mistakes has been following others. Learn about my top 5 investing mistakes in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nC-pQ56FlK4 I really like General Mills and started a position. Want to see some other recent stock analysis videos, highlighting stocks I do not like so much? Here are my stock analysis videos of AT&T and also GE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYhiIqfCRsE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2qIGUoUKrI Want to connect with me on Instagram? I’m checking all the time, so please feel free to connect: https://www.instagram.com/ianlopuch/ Disclosure: I am long General Mills (GIS), Procter & Gamble (PG), and Kimberly-Clark (KMB). I own these three stocks in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Also, I'm not a tax advisor and today's video is NOT tax advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 11975 ppcian
GROWTH STOCKS ARE BETTER THAN DIVIDEND STOCKS (If This Is You)
 
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Which is better: Growth investing or dividend investing (value investing)? In my personal situation, there is no comparison. Dividend growth investing always comes out ahead. That said, I get so many questions here about growth investing. Today, I want to share a case, a specific investor persona, where growth investing may be better than dividend investing. Put another way: If I could not invest in dividend stocks anymore (someone told me I just couldn't do it), this is the only way I could see myself being a growth investor. Today's video starts with an assumption. The assumption is that for anyone to be a grow investor, they must believe that growth stocks will outperform dividend stocks (value stocks) over the long term. Personally, I don't believe that because of the Bank of America / Merrill Lynch study that shows for the 90 years starting 1926 that value stocks have returned 17% per year while growth stocks have returned 12.6%. It's difficult for me to get past this study (link below). However, the modern growth investor must believe that past data is not an indication of the future, and everything is different now in 2018. Next, the video starts with some goals. I invest for financial freedom and cash flow. Literally, cash that can be used to cover my bills. The growth investing strategy that I'm talking about involves buy and hold for very long periods of time with zero cash flow. As such, this investor must be: * Comfortable working a job (or running their own business) - they will not be able to rely on stocks for income. * Able to buy and hold for very long periods of time such as 20-30 years with no cash flow. * Is comfortable selling equity in retirement to pay for stuff (since, in general, these growth stocks are not anticipated to pay significant dividends). Given this assumption and these goals, I now dive into some pros and cons of growth investing. And, I show how for this specific investor, growth investing may be better. Why could it be better? * The opportunity for higher returns (that's the assumption, after all). * The opportunity for a more tax advantageous strategy (all money compounds as no dividends are paid out). (That said, it's important to really trust these growth companies not to squander the money that is sitting around.) * The ability to invest in those companies that are disrupting everything. (That said, I do believe that tried-and-true blue chips are underrated on this front. One of my holdings, Pfizer (PFE), just invested $600 million in Pfizer Ventures for the purpose of innovation and disruption.) * The ability to be a risk taker. If you are a risk taker, by nature, growth investing may be more exciting and a better fit that dividend investing (which tends to be a lower risk strategy). * The ability to take on some risk (for higher potential return) during one's younger years. (That said, many young people, like myself, prefer dividends. It all comes down to one's personal situation. And, higher risk does not always mean higher return!) At the end of the day, there are many strategies out there. And, I've tried a lot of them. Dividend investing is my favorite, by far. That said, I know many subscribers are trying to figure out what's right for them. I hope today's video provides another perspective that may be helpful in your investing journey. Here's why growth investors are completely wrong about dividend investors: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=El7XyomoAEI Here's how taxes work for dividend and growth investors: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2y0CgkzgV6I Want to learn more about deep value? Here's what deep value investing is all about: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugU0a3IKul4h Here's my recent experience with Bitcoin, a growth investment that I profited from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAQHg6ag7jU Here's why I love PE Ratio: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUmgT75dBKI Here's the Bank of America / Merrill Lynch Study referenced in today’s video: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/baml-90-year-review-value-growth-stock-market-investing-strategies-140602834.html Disclosure: I am long Pfizer (ticker PFE). I own this stock in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Also, I'm not a tax advisor and today's video is NOT tax advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. Please talk to your licensed tax advisor before making any tax decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 7639 ppcian
Why I Love Dividend Growth Investing For Passive Income
 
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I invest in dividend stocks for passive income and cash flow. Learn the top five reasons today why I believe dividend growth investing is an exceptional strategy, especially as compared to trading for capital appreciation. While I believe in a diversified approach and leveraging multiple strategies in my financial portfolio, dividend growth investing is my core, favorite strategy. Learn how I plan to fund my dreams and pay living expenses via passive income from dividend checks. http://www.ppcian.com Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions.
Views: 6185 ppcian
How Long Should I Hold A Stock?
 
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To hold a stock or to sell a stock, that is the question! I recently received a question from a subscriber. The question went like this: "Ian, I have a stock that I bought for dividends and it's up 10% in a short amount of time. Should I hold and risk losing my gains, or sell and redeploy the profits in another stock?" While I do not offer investment advice, today's video covers this very question in a hypothetical way, as if I were faced with the same situation. In particular, I cover: * My strategy around not penalizing winners. In fact, when stocks are up in my dividend portfolio, I will often add more money to those stocks. I have stocks in my portfolio that are up several hundred percent. If I sold after 10% gains, I would have foregone so much. * It's typically a good thing when a stock has increased in price. Often, it means that the fundamentals are good. Revenue is up. Earnings are up. News is good. It confirms that one made a great selection. Rather than penalizing a winner, I like to double down on winners. * An increased stock price (due to strong fundamentals) is often a leading indicator of a forthcoming dividend increase. If a company has a history of increasing dividends, it surely is a good sign to see revenue, earnings, and stock price increasing. * I invest for dividends and cash flow so I almost never sell. In fact, I try not to look at day-to-day stock price fluctuations. Rather, I stay laser focused on my stream of dividend income. * With an increased stock price, current yield goes down. This makes it less fun to buy more shares. That said, current yield does not really matter. It's all about yield on cost, as covered in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8zdEaSrWmNQ * However, please keep in mind that I like to look at depressed stocks, those driven to low prices irrationally. (These are sometimes referred to as the "Dogs of the Dow".) When opening net new positions or selectively reinvesting dividends, I will often focus on those undervalued shares. That said, I don't sell winners to fund such undervalued opportunities, since it's just not consistent with my strategy (and not tax/record keeping efficient either). * Dividend growth investing is all about passive income and cash flow. Holding forever and not selling has so many advantages in my personal stock portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. Today's video does not offer tax advice either.
Views: 5683 ppcian
Dividend Growth Stocks vs. S&P 500 Index Fund
 
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What's the difference between investing in dividend-paying stocks and the S&P 500 index fund? As someone who plans on one day living off my dividend income, I am clearly in favor of individual dividend growth stocks for my personal portfolio, those stocks that raise their dividend each and every year. One day, my dividend income will surpass my living expenses. Today, I'm excited to compare and contrast dividend growth stocks with the S&P 500 these ways: * Current Yield * Fees * Principal required for living expenses * Ability to find good deals and "buy low" * Commitment required Dividend stocks may not be for everyone. The S&P 500 index fund has many applications including 401k plans and also those wanting a "hands off" approach to personal finance. However, I have concluded (over many years of investing) that dividends are for me! Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions.
Views: 6130 ppcian
Ford's 6.4% Dividend Yield & 5.97 PE (What Could Possibly Go Wrong With This Stock?)
 
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Is Ford Motor Company (F) the best dividend value stock around? With a trailing twelve month PE Ratio of 5.97 and a dividend yield (projected) of 6.4% for 2018, it may certainly seem like a great value at current prices. With my long term horizon, however, it's just not the right dividend stock for my personal stock portfolio. In today's video, I'm excited to analyze Ford in great detail, from a dividend investor standpoint. I start with some misconceptions I had before even completing the analysis. Based on the government bailout from the great recession, I certainly had thought that Ford performed worse than it actually did during the recession. While not great, I was somewhat pleasantly surprised by what I found. (Note to self: Always look at the facts and avoid bias that may be created via the media.) Next, I take a look at the most important element for this cash flow investor: The dividend. While Ford pays a nice dividend right now, they paid no dividend from 2007-2011. That's really rough for anyone relying on passive income to pay bills. If I'm relying on my dividends to put food on the table, it just isn't going to work if a company suddenly stops paying the dividend for five years! This alone is a deal-breaker for me. Next, I take a look at their share price over time. It's troublesome to me that the company has essentially gone nowhere in the last 25 years! While I don't invest for capital appreciation, I always rely on it to tell whether a company is being managed properly (and to tell whether it has the ability to grow the dividend over time). Next, I look at international diversification. It's nice to see that more than half of Ford's units are sold internationally. Next, it's onto the metrics. While revenue is growing nicely, I'm unpleasantly surprised by the volatility of net income and EPS in a really good economy. It certainly shows how the company's earnings (even during good times) can be cyclical. It gives me concern over what can happen in rough times. During this analysis, I also uncover a very low operating margin of 5% (just not high enough for me). Last, I discuss a few closing factors: * Ford's lending operation. While it seems to be managed a lot better than GE's, I just don't like that kind of exposure, especially with 8.7 leverage. * Assets and liabilities. Assets and liabilities are both skewed by Ford's lending operation. Assets are certainly not as good as they look, in my opinion. Overall, I think there are both pros and cons with this company. I certainly have more respect for it than I did before the analysis. That said, it just doesn't meet the mark for my dividend stock portfolio. What do you think about Ford? I would love to hear everyone's opinions! Mentioned in today's video, here's my dividend stock analysis of GE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2qIGUoUKrI Also mentioned in today's video, here's my Instagram: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2qIGUoUKrI Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 16548 ppcian
Investing In Real Estate: REITs or Physical Rental Properties? (Passive Income & Financial Freedom)
 
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Are you interested in investing in real estate? Are you trying to decide between REITs (real estate investment trusts) and physical rental properties? Today's video, my latest on dividend income and cash flow, approaches the topic of real estate investing from a variety of vantage points. As someone who works in the commercial real estate field and someone who has been investing in the stock market (for dividends and cash flow) for over 20 years, I share my personal perspectives. In particular, I cover: * Portfolio size required, if I were to invest in single family homes (and rent them out). With less than $200,000-$300,000 portfolio size, I personally would not consider individual rental properties (and would just stick with REITs). * Concentration of risk and diversification. Buying just one or two single family homes (with the purpose of renting them out for passive income) can create quite the concentration of risk. By comparison, blue chip stocks (large REITs and other dividend-paying stocks) are very diversified in nature. * Pros and cons of physical real estate. * Ability to drive superior returns via physical real estate investments. * Scrappy ways to get involved with real estate investments. * Weighing the pros and cons of adding more complexity and overhead to one's life (physical real estate investments carry great responsibility and time commitment). Related Video About Investing In REITs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z4igBCbEAGo Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 8345 ppcian
My TOP 5 Biggest Investing MISTAKES (Stock Market & Money Mistakes To Avoid)
 
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With 20+ years of stock market experience and a portfolio of 36 dividend-paying stocks, it may seem like investing and personal finance come easy for me. While I've always had a huge passion for investing and I had the incredible fortune of starting young, I have absolutely made my fair share of mistakes over the years. Thankfully, I have learned great lessons from each mistake. Today's video highlights my top 5 stock market (and personal finance) mistakes, with the goal of inspiring others and sharing valuable lessons learned. When I first got started, I had an incredible interest in dividend-paying stocks from the beginning. That has always been my baseline strategy. However, over the years I have experienced my fair share of distractions the wasted time, capital, and focus. In particular, today's video covers: * My experience getting started with stock market investing in the 1990s. * My mistake getting pulled into the "get rich quick" allure of penny stock trading, and the lessons I learned about "making fast money". * My mistake diving into the exciting space of fiber optics during a tech market bubble, and why "buy low, sell high" just doesn't make sense to me. * My mistake falling for a dividend stock yield trap in the mortgage REIT sector, during the height of the subprime mortgage era. This one taught me great lessons about payout ratios and investing in companies that can sustainably pay and increase dividends over the long term. * My experience buying a car way above my means (a BMW M3 Convertible), and how I quickly learned the importance of being frugal in one's personal finances. * My recent mistake buying a dividend paying stock that everyone was talking about. This is why I greatly prefer to generate my own investment ideas! And, this is why I love to diversify my portfolio. At the end of the day, investing is a process. Right around 2008, I truly figured things out and went all in on my dividend strategy. Sure, I had a baseline in dividends all along, but this is when I really "got it" in a big way, and let go of the distractions. I know I'll make more mistakes from time-to-time, but also know that mistakes are just part of the process and should be embraced for their educational value. More than anything, I truly hope you found today's video motivating! Want to learn more about my history as a dividend stock investor? Here's another fun video on the topic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=en-6reixJVE Want to see which books have influenced my investing the most? Make sure to check out my Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ianlopuch/ Want to learn a bit more about my experience with Bitcoin in 2017? Here's a video summarizing my experience: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAQHg6ag7jU Want to learn a bit more about my experience as an angel investor? Here's a video on my recent experience with SAFE Agreements: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ih2F_EUomqA Just getting started out in 2018? Here's a video that addresses this very topic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qwus0r322ak Disclosure: I own Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Also, I'm not a tax advisor and today's video is NOT tax advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 18446 ppcian
Peer To Peer Lending & Investing: Pros, Cons, & Returns
 
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I have six years of peer to peer lending and investing experience, on the LendingClub platform. I have invested in over 1,000 loans, in $25 increments. As a dividend growth investor and proponent of income investments (I optimize for passive income and yield), this video compares LendingClub (and peer to peer lending overall) to dividend stocks. In particular, I discuss the pros, cons, and returns that are possible with P2P lending. Highlights include: * I go into depth on my personal results with peer to peer lending and LendingClub. Learn about my personal net annual return (after defaults) since I started back in 2011. * Learn about the tax implications of peer to peer lending (taxed as ordinary income) versus qualified dividends (taxed as long term capital gains). * See how I leverage my peer to peer loan portfolio as a makeshift emergency fund. * Learn why I am personally at a crossroads, and am considering taking all money out of peer to peer lending and into dividend stocks. I'm at a point where it probably makes sense to just focus on one strategy, especially with my unexciting results from P2P lending. * Learn how I used to work for the CEO of LendingClub, in a prior job, and why I think the company and platform is great. * One cannot necessarily compare dividend growth investing to peer to peer lending, as they are different asset classes. That said, the comparison is important to my portfolio. * Learn how investing in peer to peer loans helps people out (those borrowing money). Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 14841 ppcian
Growth Investors Are Completely Wrong (About Dividend Investors)
 
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Growth investors often misunderstand dividend investing. In fact, I regularly receive comments and questions here about the purpose of dividends. Many growth investors see little to no point of dividend checks, and they'd rather just sell shares of stock when they need cash for bills. In fact, many argue that a dividend is the exact same thing as selling shares (it's forced selling). Today's video shares why this theory is wrong, in my opinion. First, I start out with some important concepts: ex-dividend date, record date, an payment date. Using Southern Company (SO) as an example, I show how the closing price per share on the day before the ex-dividend date drops by the dividend amount (as compared to the opening price the next day, the ex-dividend date). The reason: The market makers lower the price per share to reflect the dividend payout. This back ground is important because it is true and is often cited by growth stock investors as to why dividends add no value. However, I next dive into the composition of a company to dispel this myth. Each share of stock represents ownership in a company. When one owns a company, it's not just about the cash. It's about the future stream of revenue/income, brand, intellectual property, buildings, assets, people, technology, cash, and more. When one sells stock to pay bills (the growth investor), they are selling it all. By contrast, when one receives a dividend, one is exclusively pulling from the cash bucket. One's shares lose a little bit of cash (that is paid out as a dividend) but the same shares retain everything else. It's like the goose that laid the golden egg. The dividend investor is enjoying the golden egg, and taking great care of the goose. The growth investor is literally selling the entire goose! I close out with an illustration of how a stock can trend up and down over time. If one is to live off their investments, dividend stocks are so much more practical! One can enjoy a growing stream of dividends regardless of the overall stock market trajectory. Growth investors, however, may be forced to sell shares in a down market. If one wants to live off passive income, growth stocks just are not going to cut it, in my humble opinion. That said, there are other scenarios where growth stocks may make a ton of sense! As mentioned in today's video, here's my video about Southern Company: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SW_jAVvhEqw Want to learn about my recent Dr. Pepper Snapple sale and how I reinvested my profits? Check it out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8npn2NqbzA Want to learn about my very own "growth stock" experience in 2017? Here’s my experience with Bitcoin: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAQHg6ag7jU Disclosure: I am long Southern Comapny (SO). I own this stock in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Also, I'm not a tax advisor and today's video is NOT tax advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 8438 ppcian
Investing For Financial Freedom: How Much? (Dividend Growth Stocks)
 
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A 40-year-old subscriber just asked how much money he needs to invest to reach financial freedom. Specifically, he wants to pay for all of his living expenses via dividends. Today's video discusses this very topic from a variety of angles. In particular, I cover: * The value of starting as early as possible with dividend growth investing. I personally invest for dividend checks and cash flow. * How time can be even more valuable than capital invested in the stock market. * Why it's important to have clear goals. When do you want to achieve financial freedom? * How it's easy to get started building passive income with dividend growth stocks with as little as $25, via dividend reinvestment plans (or DRIPs). * How to determine the precise amount one needs to invest, using the power of a work back plan and a little modeling in Excel. * Two specific dividend income models, one for a 30-year-old and one for a 40-year-old. * I share the specific models and calculations to determine how much money one must invest for their desired level of dividend income. Today's video is a little more technical than the others. If you're serious about financial freedom, now is the time to model out your future. Start modeling out your dividend growth portfolio! As a related video, here's how to get started with dividend investing for as little as $25 per month: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWdptrcEKGo Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 9067 ppcian
why i do it (DIVERSIFYING WITH 38 DIVIDEND STOCKS, BABY!)
 
20:49
Why do I do it? Why on earth do I own 38 stocks in my dividend stock portfolio? That sure sounds like a lot! Diversification - that is the topic of today’s investing video. I wouldn't have it any other way. I love owning 38 stocks, and am excited to share my investing strategy today. First and foremost, I am not like other investors. I’m not in this for total returns. I'm not in this for a traditional retirement. I want immediate cash flow that can be used to pay bills now. I want early retirement and complete financial freedom (cash flow pays all my bills). For that reason, I'm all about dividends (cash flow). If I only owned 10 stocks, and one cut their dividend, that would be quite the disruption to my cash flow. If 1 out of 38 has some issues, that will not make or break my early retirement. I leverage the example of an employer-employee relationship in today's video. What would it feel like if your boss cut your salary by 10%? It's the same dynamic with dividends. Maybe a small but (or temporary suspension) would be ok, but definitely not 10%. My goal is building a disruption proof portfolio. My portfolio is like a tank! Today's video also responds to some subscriber questions and feedback. I want to share with everyone today that I am a very practical investor. From an academic standpoint, anything can be argued. Academics can use any data set to prove any point. From a practical standpoint, 38 stocks works for me! I like to own dividend stocks in most major sectors and sub-sectors. Moreover, certain sectors warrant intra-sector diversification due to concentration risk. Some great examples include: oil/energy, utilities, and healthcare. I don't only look at my portfolio in terms of percentage allocation. I also look at dollar allocation. Because my portfolio is more seasoned, it has grown in size. 1% of the total is a lot of money, so I have no problem owning 1% stock positions. Last, it just works for me! Owning 38 stocks (will likely eventually be 40) motivates me and keeps me on track! At the end of the day, that's a really big deal. Some bonus points in today's video: * Learn why it's not that difficult to manage 38 stocks. * Learn why owning such a diverse portfolio makes it easier for me (on a monthly basis) to allocate new capital. Want to learn about Procter & Gamble, a stock I'm buying in 2018? Check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGRmIeiep1g Want to learn how I stay motivated towards my goals of driving dividend income? Here's a fun video (an older one): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPQ3BQP0YFs I just purchased a new stock! Learn all about it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhujBcrq8Xg Don't forget to reach out and connect on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ianlopuch/ Disclosure: I am long Procter & Gamble (PG). I own this stock in my stock portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and PPC Ian videos, Excel files, and content are just for entertainment and fun. PPC Ian videos, Excel files, and content are NOT investment advice. Also, I'm not a tax advisor and PPC Ian videos, Excel files, and content are NOT tax advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. Please talk to your licensed tax advisor before making any tax decisions. All PPC Ian videos, Excel files, and other content are (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 7383 ppcian
Dividend Stocks Vs. Growth Stocks (Investing For Dividends and Cash Flow)
 
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Today, I will compare and contrast dividend stocks versus growth stocks. You often hear about two types of investors: Those that invest for dividends (typically falling into the value investing category) vs. those that invest for capital appreciation (typically called growth investors). Learn why I have concluded that dividend investing is right for me, and how I plan to pay for all of my living expenses via dividends one day. Learn about the following personal finance topics: * Dividends and capital appreciation * Volatility * Established businesses vs. less established businesses * Bull markets vs. bear markets * Principal * Capital allocation While dividend stocks and growth stocks each have their pros and cons, I buy very few growth stocks since my strategy is so tied to passive income and cash flow. In fact, I don't really track share prices nor portfolio value as closely as I track my stream of passive dividend income. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions.
Views: 4426 ppcian
INVESTING TAXES EXPLAINED: Dividend Vs. Growth Investing
 
30:54
By subscriber request, today's video is my guide to taxes explained for investors. Over my 20+ years investing, I have picked up a wealth of knowledge on the taxation of investments. While I'm not a licensed tax advisor and today's video is not tax advice, I wanted to share my personal thoughts on the topic for dividend investors and growth investors alike. A continuation of my last video (dividend investing vs. growth investing), I want to illustrate via taxes why I personally prefer dividend investing, as it is a tax efficient vehicle (in my personal opinion). I start out with two examples, my recent short-term capital gain on my Bitcoin profit. And, my ownership in McDonald's (MCD), a long-term dividend growth stock, where I'm deferring capital gains (since I never plan to sell) and only have to worry about taxes on my qualified dividends (which fall into the long-term capital gains bucket). Some fun facts you'll learn from my Bitcoin illustration: * I earned 329% in less than a year on my Bitcoin position. * I was subject to short term capital gains. * There is no way I could have held longer (it still have not been 1 year and Bitcoin has fallen 50% from my average sale price). This, in a nutshell, is what plagues growth investors most. Some fun facts you'll learn from my McDonald’s illustration: * I am up 116% via capital appreciation, but owe no taxes right now since I don't intend to sell. (Taxes are only due if one were to sell.) * I enjoy a 5.5% yield on cost (and growing). My dividends are taxed at the lower long-term capital gains tax rate. * Dividend income is taxed at a lower rate than income earned from working! I am incentivized to earn passive vs. active income. For someone looking to live off dividends, this is why I believe dividends are so tax efficient. After my two examples, I dive into a variety of tax-related topics (for investors of all sorts): * Capital appreciation * Dividends * Short-term capital gains * Long-term capital gains * The 3.8% Medicare tax (Obamacare tax) * Qualified dividends vs. non-qualified dividends * Federal vs. state taxes * International companies (and tax implications) * Tax-advantaged vs. non-tax-advantaged accounts (401k and Roth IRA) * More! Want to lean more about dividend stocks vs. growth stocks? Check out this recent video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=El7XyomoAEI Want to learn about my experience with Bitcoin? Here you go: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAQHg6ag7jU Here's my #3 favorite dividend stock of all time, McDonald's (MCD): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WA1baKYgV_0 Here's my real estate investment trust (REIT) that is a non-qualified dividend, Realty Income: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-ANUrAsqMc Disclosure: I am long McDonald's (ticker MCD) and Realty Income (ticker O). I own both of these stocks in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Also, I'm not a tax advisor and today's video is NOT tax advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. Please talk to your licensed tax advisor before making any tax decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 10047 ppcian
SCARED To Start Investing In 2018? (Here's My Dividend Investing Perspective)
 
18:26
Are you scared to start investing in 2018? Do you think the stock market will crash sometime in 2018 or soon thereafter? Are you concerned that you will lose money by investing now? Today's video addresses these very questions through the lens of dividend growth investing. As a dividend growth investor, I'm not as concerned with stock market volatility because I invest for dividends and cash flow. (The underlying equity value and capital appreciation is not as important to me.) Today, I am excited to share a few frameworks that may help investors considering starting out in 2018. Framework 1: It takes time to learn investing. The sooner one starts, the sooner one can learn the basics of dividend growth investing. Mistakes will often be made. It's always easier to make such mistakes sooner than later. Framework 2: Dividend growth investing is all about time and persistence. It can take decades of averaging in to deploy enough capital to achieve financial freedom. Accumulating a snowball of dividend income takes time. When one starts sooner than later, that dividend income starts building. And, even if the market corrects, one can buy all the way down (more time to average in at lower prices)! Remember: As share prices go down, starting dividend yield goes up. As a dividend investor, I like to see share prices go down. Framework 3: Given the late stage bull market, perhaps in addition to starting, one ought to consider an emergency fund. When I started, I went "all in" with no emergency fund. Today's market is different. Perhaps an investing plus emergency fund strategy may create peace of mind for late market stage investors. I am personally focused on building up an emergency fund in 2018. At the end of the day, loss of capital is not as worrisome for dividend growth investors, in my opinion. The dividends are the goal, not the capital appreciation. Of course, it's never fun to "lose" capital (on paper), but the dividend strategy certainly reduces market volatility concerns in my particular situation. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 18181 ppcian
How I Know Which STOCKS To Buy (Dividend Growth Investing)
 
18:09
I own 37 dividend stocks in my stock portfolio. On any given month, I'm almost always averaging in (buying more shares). How do I know which stock(s) to buy at a given time? How do I invest my hard earned capital in dividend stocks, while looking at things both logically and emotionally? Today's video shares my very strategy. Before even starting, it's important to recognize whether one is looking at a net new portfolio or an established one. While most of today's video covers the strategy of how I buy stocks for my established dividend portfolio, I also discuss how things would differ for a newer portfolio. Next, I dive into my personal pillars for success. Pillar 1: I enjoy setting strategic buy order themes each year. Each January I pick a few stocks that I'll focus on accumulating any given year. This year, it's Procter & Gamble and Kimberly Clark. My analysis is based on fundamentals. By setting the theme early in the year, I stay focused and determined. Pillar 2: When I invest in a new position to my established stock portfolio, I go "all in". Meaning: I will start with a small lump sum investment, and then I keep averaging in until my position reaches its desired size (and, at a minimum, my "full size" for a small position). I believe in good housekeeping and dislike 1-off positions in my portfolio. Pillar 3: I'm always looking out for great investment opportunities. Since I own 37 stocks, several of them are always on sale at any given time. While I like to first focus on pillars 1 and 2, I will buy "on sale" stocks as well, when opportunities present themselves. Pillar 4: Certain of my stocks fall into trading ranges, more or less. I like to place a small amount of capital in them, each time they hit the bottom of the trading range. At the end of the day, this strategic framework keeps my investing vey logical and pragmatic. It keeps me focused on doing the right things, avoiding all the noise out there. It also, however, leaves some room for emotion which I think is actually important for dividend growth investors. As mentioned in today's video, I have quite a few related videos to share with all of you! Following is my long list of related investing videos that you may want to check out. First, let's jump into videos that discuss hypothetical scenarios of starting all over again. Following are the ways I would start, if I were hypothetically starting over with different amounts of money! Investing My First $1,000: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iijz-5vGSh0 Investing My First $5,000: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Bp0TzQKRr0 Investing My First $10,000: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4i_3KAY1ZMo Investing My First $25,000: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGrf5He8ieU Investing My First: $50,000: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ishEcrSTK-c Also mentioned in today's video, here's some info on my personal stock portfolio, on my small, medium, and large/core strategy. Learn about my personal asset allocation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ybS8GQl_vA Each year, I like to set strategic themes for my buy orders (pillar 1 of my strategy). This year, my strategic theme spans Procter & Gamble and Kimberly-Clark. Learn all about my dividend investing strategic themes for 2018: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGRmIeiep1g While I don't buy many net new stock positions these days, when I do I'm all in. (In the sense that I will keep buying and averaging in until the position reaches full size.) Here's a stock I just started buying, General Mills (pillar 2 of my strategy): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z12Ac83Nz0Q While I mainly focus on pillars 1 and 2 of my buy order strategy, I just can't pass up a good opportunity. I also like to make incremental buy orders of dividend portfolio stocks that are "on sale". This year, I'm buying some Southern Corporation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SW_jAVvhEqw And, Realty Income: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-ANUrAsqMc Last, I want to share my recent analysis of Coca-Cola. While I own this stock in my portfolio (and it's a core position), I won't be buying more this year. It's just not "on sale" right now, and it doesn't fit my strategic pillars. That said, if I were hypothetically starting all over again with a net new portfolio, perhaps things would be different: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Egb3PfTOtSs Disclosure: I am long Procter & Gamble (PG), Kimberly-Clark (KMB), General Mills (GIS), Southern Company (SO), Realty Income (O), and Coca-Cola (KO). I own these stocks in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Also, I'm not a tax advisor and today's video is NOT tax advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 11212 ppcian
THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN RICH AND POOR PEOPLE (dividends are the answer)
 
24:09
"If you don't find a way to make money while you sleep, you will work until you die." - Warren Buffett. A PPC Ian subscriber just sent me this quote about investing for dividends and passive income, and I totally love it! I actually shared this quote on my Twitter and it turned into a debate. Today's video digs into the philosophy behind dividend growth investing and the difference between good work and bad work. It also highlights the difference between rich people and poor people. Whether Warren Buffett said this quote or not (my Internet research shows he did), it's really relevant to dividend growth investing. Get ready for a really exciting video about money and personal finance! I start with good work and bad work. I first want to clear something up. Of course, when I achieve full financial freedom I do not want to sit around all day and be lazy! I still want to be incredibly productive and pursue "work". It just so happens that there is a huge difference between good work and bad work. Examples of good work: * Running and exercise * Philanthropy * Pursuing one's passions * Starting a business * A dream job that fully aligns with one's values and passions, while also giving sufficient time flexibility (warning: this situation can quickly morph into bad work since can circumstances change) Bad work: * Being tied to a 9-to-5 job that one hates * Having a really horrible manager * Having little or no time to oneself * Feeling trapped Ultimately, I believe Warren Buffet's quote above applies to bad work. Of course, we have all been there and it's necessary at time to just roll up one's sleeves and earn some income. Unfortunately, for many people, bad work tends to pay well and is required to pay the bills. At the end of the day, passive income from dividend paying stocks are the answer, in my opinion. Not having passive income can be incredibly risky. Learn in today's video how dividends can be the catalyst to take the steps necessary to move from a bad situation to a good one! On a related note, I also discuss the difference between the rich and the poor. In my opinion, being rich has nothing to do with money. It has everything to do with command over time. Even if one has a Ferrari and fancy house, they still may be poor if they're tied to a less than desirable job. (Perhaps this person has even fooled themselves into believing they like their job. More on this in today's video too!) Download my entire dividend stock portfolio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6S-7R8iihPk Learn about my #1 favorite dividend stock here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkgzdwAqPho I used to weigh a lot more than I do now! Learn about my personal transformation here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wMLztI-Fnk Let's connect on Twitter (I'm @ianlopuch): https://twitter.com/ianlopuch Let's connect on Instagram (I'm @ianlopuch): https://www.instagram.com/ianlopuch/ DISCLOSURE: I am long Johnson & Johnson (JNJ). I own this stock in my stock portfolio. DISCLAIMER: All information and data on my YouTube Channel, blog, email newsletters, white papers, Excel files, and other materials is solely for informational purposes. I make no representations as to the accuracy, completeness, suitability or validity of any information. I will not be liable for any errors, omissions, losses, injuries or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided AS IS with no warranties, and confers no rights. I will not be responsible for the accuracy of material that is linked on this site. Because the information herein is based on my personal opinion and experience, it should not be considered professional financial investment advice or tax advice. The ideas and strategies that I provide should never be used without first assessing your own personal/financial situation, or without consulting a financial and/or tax professional. My thoughts and opinions may also change from time to time as I acquire more knowledge. These are, as discussed above, solely my thoughts and opinions. I reserve the right to delete any comments for any reason (abusive in nature, contain profanity, etc.). Your continued reading/use of my YouTube Channel, blog, email newsletters, whitepapers, Excel files, and other materials constitutes your agreement with and acceptance of this disclaimer. COPYRIGHT: All PPC Ian videos, Excel files, guides, and other content are (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC. PPC Ian is a registered trademark (tm) of IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 12209 ppcian
1 Stock With MASSIVE Dividend Growth
 
15:05
I love stocks that raise their dividends aggressively. Today's video covers a stock in my personal portfolio that just raised its dividend by 20%, a massive increase. And, since 2010, the dividend has been increased by 328.6% - amazing! I'm talking about Starbucks stock. I'm not just a dividend investor, I'm a dividend growth investor - with "growth" being a very key word here. Learn why dividend growth is so incredibly powerful. In today's video, I run three scenarios on Starbucks stock to understand where yield on cost could be ten years from now. * Aggressive case: 12.1% yield on cost * Moderate case: 7.9% yield on cost * Conservative case: 5.1% yield on cost Also, I spend time covering some fundamental analysis on Starbucks. Learn why I look at metrics such as debt, net margins, payout ratio, revenue growth, and net income growth. At the end of the day, my portfolio contains three types of dividend stocks: 1) Large current yield, but low growth 2) Moderate current yield, moderate dividend growth 3) Low current yield, massive dividend growth (SBUX falls in to this category) Mentioned in today's video, you may want to check out my video on income statement analysis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fDxYxsvPc_s Also mentioned in today's video, you may want to check out my recent video about Kimberly Clark and Procter & Gamble stock: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGRmIeiep1g Last, please consider reaching out on Twitter. I'm very active these days on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ianlopuch Disclosure: I am long Starbucks (SBUX), Kimberly-Clark (KMB), and Procter & Gamble (PG). I own these stocks in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 6444 ppcian
My TOP 2 Stocks For 2018 (Investing For Dividends)
 
16:20
What are my top, favorite stocks for 2018, from a dividend investing perspective? Which stocks am I personally buying in 2018? Today's video covers the two stocks that I'm averaging into throughout 2018, Kimberly-Clark (KMB) and Procter & Gamble (PG). This year is all about doubling down on my core positions (anchor positions), while investing in value. When I analyze my core positions, KMB and PG are the two that are trading at a reasonable value right now, in my opinion. Learn why I love these stocks for long-term dividend growth investing: * Core positions * Minimal industry disruption possible * Reasonable values in today's stock market (late stage bull market) * Benefit from long-term global population growth * Help de-risk my portfolio * Perfect for my particular portfolio, at this time Today's video goes into some specific metrics as well and how to analyze dividend growth stocks. I enjoy discussing: * PE Ratio * Current Yield * Yield On Cost * Market Capitalization * Debt * Payout Ratio At the end of the day, 2018 is a year of realistic expectations for this investor. We are at the end of a late stage bull market. I do not expect huge gains, but that being said I am always averaging in and I am ready to buy increasing values during the next market correction. Also, my two selections are not only a reflection of value, but also my specific situation as well. Learn why, at this stage of my own portfolio, I feel compelled to add a higher allocation of my stock portfolio towards KMB and PG. Mentioned in today's video, PE Ratio is a very important metric in my dividend stock analysis. Here's a video I filmed about PE Ratio: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUmgT75dBKI Also mentioned in today's video, I have an ongoing series where I'm analyzing KMB in great depth. Here's the first video in my dividend stock analysis series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DP6_mtdDYBI Disclosure: I am long Kimberly-Clark (KMB) and Procter & Gamble (PG). I own both of these stocks in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 24512 ppcian
Dividend Reinvestment Plans (DRIPs): How To Drive Passive Income Investing Only $25/Month
 
17:34
In the world of dividend growth investing (and personal finance overall), I believe Dividend Reinvestment Plans (DRIPs and DSPs) are overlooked. While they may be "old school" in an era of new investing platforms, I personally believe dividend reinvestment plans are great for dividend investors seeking passive income and cash flow (with the goal of covering living expenses via passive income). Today, learn my top five insights about dividend reinvestment plans: (1) low barriers to entry / start with only $25/month, (2) great process and strategy (via reinvestment and dollar cost averaging), (3) automation and paying yourself first, (4) willpower/longevity, and (5) low fees (many times). Also, I share two items to "watch out" for when evaluating DRIP plans. Thanks for stopping by, and please make sure to subscribe/check back! I've got more videos on the way. http://www.ppcian.com Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions.
Views: 8251 ppcian
WALGREENS STOCK PLUMMETS TO 6-YEAR LOW (Buying Opportunity for Long-Term Dividend Investors?)
 
24:08
This #dividend growth #stock just plummeted 13% in a single day! And, that's after already falling considerably over the last few years. I'm talking about #Walgreens Boots Alliance (WBA), a favorite stock among dividend value investors. Now trading at the lowest levels in 6-years (you have to go back to 9/2013 to get this low), learn what I think about this stock in today's investing video. At a high level, I actually like this stock (unlike competitors CVS). So, I'm taking a serious look at it here, in today's video. Dividend: * 3.25% dividend yield * Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 7% from the last 5 years * Low payout ratio Q2 Earnings Report (WBA got hammered on this news): * EPS at $1.64 vs. $1.72 analyst expectations * Stock fell 13% in a single day * 2019 anticipated to be flat with 2018 from an EPS perspective * Growth is gone! * Pressures in pharmacy pricing * Margins getting squeezed in pharmacy * Implementing cost cutting measures In my humble opinion, cost cutting is not enough! Cost cutting is not going to be the complete solution here and WBA needs to figure out more. In terms of current valuation, this dividend stock is priced as if it's going out of business! * PE ratio of 10.68 * It's priced worse than the numbers would seem to indicate Historically, growth has been strong: * Rev +72% in the last 5 years * EPS +150% in the last 5 years * LT debt $12 billion (not too bad), but they do have a higher accounts payable than I'd like to see What I like: * Historical growth * Relatively strong balance sheet * Clean business model * PE ratio, dividend growth, valuation * Pristine shops * Convenience store model * Buying up Rite Aid stores What I dislike: * High accounts payable * Changing space, lack of secret sauce * Less pricing capability * Amazon * Stance on sin stocks * Not passionate about space * Enough retail exposure already While I'm going to keep this on the watch list, I do not feel enough of a reason (in my personal portfolio) to dig deeper and consider a buy order. Here's my recent video stock analysis of CVS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SmaTpiXfItc Here's my old school video (a very popular one) on how to invest $10,000, dividend investing style: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4i_3KAY1ZMo Here's my video stock analysis of Walmart (WMT), a stock I own: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhXgrVwEJOc Disclosure: MMM, WMT, Bitcoin DISCLOSURE: I am long 3M (MMM) and Walmart (WMT). I own these stocks in my stock portfolio. Also, I am long Bitcoin. DISCLAIMER: All information and data on my YouTube Channel, blog, email newsletters, white papers, Excel files, and other materials is solely for informational purposes. I make no representations as to the accuracy, completeness, suitability or validity of any information. I will not be liable for any errors, omissions, losses, injuries or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided AS IS with no warranties, and confers no rights. I will not be responsible for the accuracy of material that is linked on this site. Because the information herein is based on my personal opinion and experience, it should not be considered professional financial investment advice or tax advice. The ideas and strategies that I provide should never be used without first assessing your own personal/financial situation, or without consulting a financial and/or tax professional. My thoughts and opinions may also change from time to time as I acquire more knowledge. These are, as discussed above, solely my thoughts and opinions. I reserve the right to delete any comments for any reason (abusive in nature, contain profanity, etc.). Your continued reading/use of my YouTube Channel, blog, email newsletters, whitepapers, Excel files, and other materials constitutes your agreement with and acceptance of this disclaimer. COPYRIGHT: All PPC Ian videos, Excel files, guides, and other content are (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC. PPC Ian is a registered trademark (tm) of IJL Productions LLC
Views: 10664 ppcian
Pay Off Your Mortgage Early? No Way! (Dividend Stocks Are Better)
 
09:12
A lot of the financial experts out there suggest that one should pay off their mortgage early. They share strategies for making extra mortgage payments (including bi-weekly mortgage payments), reducing the number of years in one's mortgage loan. I completely disagree with the experts out there, and want to propose a contrarian opinion on the topic. As a homeowner myself, I think it makes no sense to pay off one's mortgage early. All investors have a finite amount of money. And, I look at everything in life as an investment. If I have two options: (A) pay off part of my mortgage early or (B) invest in dividend growth stocks, I always end up picking Option B. Why? It makes more financial sense. It's a better investment and a better use of capital. In today's video, I explore this topic in depth. I share real numbers that prove dividend stocks are a superior investment as compared to paying off a mortgage early (or making extra bi-weekly mortgage payments). Even more than dividend stocks being a better use of capital, they also provide more flexibility should times get though. They provide real dollars (cash flow) that can fund living expenses. Once one makes an extra mortgage payment, that money is gone and is difficult to tap into. At the end of the day, the meta level message here is to question everything you hear. The experts may not be right. Today's video is one of unconventional wisdom. Learn why dividend growth stocks and passive income are game-changers. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 11603 ppcian
How To Invest $50,000 In The Stock Market (2018 Dividend Style)
 
21:10
Let's say I was just starting out with dividend growth investing in 2018, with $50,000 of capital (hypothetically speaking). It's a unique time to start because the stock market is at all time highs. For this very reason, especially when starting out with larger capital investments (such as $50,000 or more), I would be incredibly focused on risk management and dollar cost averaging over time. Importantly, today's video builds on others in the same series. If you have not yet seen my videos on how to invest $1,000, $5,000, $10,000, and $25,000, you may want to check those out first (links to those videos below). Since I don't want to repeat myself, as I know your time is valuable, today's video offers net new perspectives for one investing $50,000. (Of course, my video has a dividend focus, as that's my personal strategy.) When investing $25,000 or less, I more or less would just go for it. I would want my dividend income to start building immediately. However, $50,000 is a serious amount of money. It's a high enough sum that I would introduce some serious multi-year averaging. Today's video discusses: * The current state of the stock market. We are near all time highs. The market will correct at some point, in my opinion. As such, I would avoid a lump sum investment with this amount of money. Rather, I would average in over two or three years. * That being said, my averaging schedule would depend on how much future capital I have to invest. If I have an incremental $1 million coming my way, for example, I would deploy my $50,000 faster. If I have $5,000/year to invest in the future, by contrast, I would average my $50,000 over a longer time period. * Learn why dividend investing is the strategy of choice, especially in a late stage bull market. Buy low and sell high is going to be very difficult in this market. Investing for income (especially when averaging in) could work quite well. * Learn why it's going to require rock solid discipline to start investing $50,000 in 2018. One will need to be ready for the correction, and potentially short term "loss" of capital. That said, corrections are often the best time for dividend investors to acquire positions. (I personally love corrections since starting yield goes up as share prices go down.) * See how great companies tend to raise and grow their dividends despite overall stock market performance. As long as business fundamentals are solid, dividends can increase each year. For this reason, it's a lot of fun to buy dividend stocks during bear market sales. If you enjoyed today's video, I have a multitude of related videos that I'm sure will add value! Here's my video on investing one's first $1,000 in dividend paying stocks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iijz-5vGSh0 Want to learn how to invest $5,000 in the stock market? Here you go: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Bp0TzQKRr0 How about $10,000? This video is one of my most popular ones: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4i_3KAY1ZMo Finally, here is how I would hypothetically invest $25,000 in dividend stocks, if I were starting all over again: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGrf5He8ieU In 2018, I'm really focused on investing in core positions that are also exhibit value. Procter & Gamble and Kimberly Clark are two of my favorites this year. Learn more in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGRmIeiep1g With interest rates increasing, utilities are under a lot of pressure. This creates a nice buying opportunity, in my opinion. Learn more about my position in Southern Company in 2018 and beyond: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SW_jAVvhEqw I am also finding value right now in REITs, especially Realty Income. Learn more in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-ANUrAsqMc Want to connect with me on social media? (Make sure to reach out via a public comment, so everyone can benefit from our discussion. I don't check private comments as frequently.) Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/ianlopuch/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/ianlopuch Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/ppcian Disclosure: I am long Procter & Gamble (PG), Kimberly-Clark (KMB), Realty Income (O), and Southern Company (SO). I own all four of these stocks in my dividend stock portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Also, I'm not a tax advisor and today's video is NOT tax advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 21051 ppcian
Dividend Stocks: I Can't STOP Buying Them
 
14:22
When one starts investing in dividend stocks for passive income (literally dividend checks that can be used to pay the bills), it's easy to "over invest". From personal experience, there are times where I really stretched myself via my "all in" investing strategy. (In fact, this has been my investing strategy for the greater part of my investing journey to-date.) The positive feedback loop with dividend investing is almost instantaneous. One invests money, and the dividend checks start coming right away! These days, since we're in a late stage bull market and because my financial needs have changed (I have a family and want to be a little more conservative), I'm transitioning towards less of an "all in" strategy. Of course, I'm not selling any of my stocks. I never want to sell, as I invest for dividend checks and cash flow. I'm just trying to save up an emergency fund, a cash buffer, in addition to my monthly stock investments. It's all about creating that peace of mind as we reach late bull market territory. Today's video tackles this very challenge. How can someone who "can't stop buying dividend stocks" transition to a more balanced situation? In particular, I show two types of investors. Investor 1 goes all in. Investor 1 may even spend money above and beyond their paycheck (money they don't have) to buy extra shares of dividend paying stocks. Investor 2, by contrast, stays within their means. Investor 2 invests in the stock market each month but also saves cash. Investor 2 never goes above and beyond their paycheck with their investments. Personally, I think one can be both Investor 1 and Investor 2, it just goes in stages. Previously, I was Investor 1 all the way. Now, I'm transitioning to Investor 2. That said, I may become Investor 1 again if a bear market strikes (and stocks are on sale). Tips covered in todays video include: * The art of paying oneself first, building up that cash buffer in a separate bank account. * The beauty of making dividend growth investing a family priority and goal. * The value of keeping great records, keeping an investing journal, and giving each stock purchase the respect that it deserves. * How living a frugal lifestyle and finding ways to save money both complements dividend investing while also slowing things down a bit. At the end of the day, investing is fluid and each investor will experience various stages in their own journey. Today's video is an overview of my current stage. And, I believe it will be helpful for others too as I frequently get the question from those who believe they are over-investing and moving too quickly. Want to learn more about my "all in" strategy and how I took on conscious risk for the majority of my investing career, supercharging my stock portfolio? Here's how I have historically approached things: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHAlpQCWAhw Want to learn more about my 2018 financial goals and how things are starting to change for this investor? Here you go: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HAz0Ky7Fm84 Want to connect on Instagram? I'm checking it all the time, so please feel free to reach out: https://www.instagram.com/ianlopuch/ Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 8212 ppcian
dividend investing does not work (BECAUSE OF INFLATION)
 
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Dividend investing simply does not work! With the historical rate of inflation hovering around 3% per year (looking at 1913 - 2013), inflation simply eats away at one's dividend income (since many stocks I buy pay a starting yield of around 3%). Just kidding! Of course this is not the case. However, I receive this comment all the time, and many people believe this myth. Today's video looks at dividend growth investing versus inflation and shows why dividend investing works despite inflation. Today's investing video gets a bit technical with some specific models. In an effort to make things simple (and based on long-time subscriber request), I'm thrilled to share with you my dividend investing Excel model today. You can download the model and follow along here: http://www.ppcian.com/ppc-ian-dividend-investing-yield-on-cost-worksheet/ I start out today with a discussion of historical inflation. Personally, I think inflation is more in the 2% range. That said, I am willing to take 3% for the purposes of this video to be conservative. Next, I dive into several models that show why starting yield doesn't really matter. It's all about dividend growth investing (not just dividend investing). The key term here is growth. Yes, starting yields can get cancelled out by inflation (at least partially), but I'm in it for the dividend growth. Most of the companies I own have a track record of raising their dividends each year. And, when one compounds many years of dividend increases, inflation is left in the dust! I'm personally experiencing dividend growth that far outpaces inflation. Since my modeling is a little conservative, I next transition into some real world examples form my personal portfolio. I show some examples of recent dividend increases that are out of this world. With these types of dividend increases over time, inflation becomes a distant memory in the rear view mirror. Stocks covered include: Starbucks (SBUX), Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), PepsiCo (PEP), Clorox (CLX), and McDonalds (MCD). Last, I dive into a topic that I think most investors miss. In my opinion, dividend investors (more so than anyone) face the opportunity to decrease expenses. They have the opportunity to experience budget deflation, making the concept of inflation even less significant. As humans, we tend to place roadblocks. We tend to get scared. In my humble opinion, it’s important to recognize inflation, but I certainly don't let it stand in the way of my dividend investing strategy. In terms of earning income to pay the bills, it really doesn't get much better than dividends, in my opinion. Want to learn more about yield on cost? Here’s my original video on yield on cost that started it all: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zw5uUeecFKk Disclosure: I am long Starbucks (SBUX), Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), PepsiCo (PEP), Clorox (CLX), and McDonald (MCD). I own all of these stocks in my stock portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and PPC Ian videos, Excel files, and content are just for entertainment and fun. PPC Ian videos, Excel files, and content are NOT investment advice. Also, I'm not a tax advisor and PPC Ian videos, Excel files, and content are NOT tax advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. Please talk to your licensed tax advisor before making any tax decisions. All PPC Ian videos, Excel files, and other content are (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 13021 ppcian
DIVIDEND Stocks Pay The Bills (Growth Stocks Do Not)
 
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Dividend stocks versus growth stocks, that is the question! If you've been on my channel for a while, you know that I'm a dividend stock guy, all the way. That said, most of my dividend stocks are also growth stocks, so I guess I enjoy the best of both worlds. At the end of the day, I will live off my dividend income. Dividend stocks pay for stuff, they pay the bills. In my opinion, it's not practical to pay for one's living expenses with non-dividend growth stocks. Stocks go up and stocks go down. Mr. Market might feel particularly happy one day, and very sad the next. When one relies on underlying equity prices to pay the bills, it's just not practical. For example: What if one's phone bill comes due, and stocks are at a low. Then, one has to sell shares at a low price just to pay the bills. By contrast, the dividend stocks I own pay dividends in both good times and bad. More than that, they actually tend to raise dividends each year (even during a bear market). I can take my dividends and pay for things like utility bills, groceries, insurance, or even the mortgage. And, I can do this without touching the underlying capital/principal. Today's video goes into the classical debate between income investors and growth investors. Topics covered include: * Why dividends work for me. * A graphical representation of how dividends flow in and pay bills, regardless of the underlying stock price. * Why dividend-paying companies tend to be more shareholder-friendly. * How value stocks tend to perform very well over the long-term. * Why dividends can be more tax efficient than selling shares to pay expenses. While I'm reinvesting all of my dividends right now, compounding my income snowball, one day I will live off my dividends. I love the fact that my portfolio provides me the flexibility to change course tomorrow, if needed. The dividends are already flowing in! Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Also, I'm not a tax advisor and today's video is NOT tax advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 6752 ppcian
Generating MONTHLY DIVIDENDS For Early Retirement and Financial Freedom
 
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I invest for dividends because I will one day live off dividends. One day, dividends will fully replace my earned income. With earned income (working a job and/or performing consulting), paychecks are rather regular. In fact, many jobs pay employees twice per month. Dividends, by contrast, are more lumpy. In the United States, dividend checks typically come quarterly. In the rest of the world, sometimes dividends are paid twice per year. When one transitions from earned income to full time early retirement (also known as financial freedom), budgeting is key. Lumpy dividend payouts are more difficult to budget than a regular, twice per month paycheck. Today's video is about this very topic. Today's video covers strategies for making dividend payouts more regular and fluid, just like one's paycheck. I also cover strategies to get ready for either partial or full financial freedom. In particular, I cover: * Why having a cash buffer is so important heading into financial freedom. Financial freedom should carry less stress, not more stress. One does not want to wait for dividend checks to pay bills, and a cash buffer can be truly invaluable. * Why I own a stock that pays monthly dividends. Why this company has a unique place in my portfolio and helps create more fluidity in my dividend income. While I only own one monthly dividend company, it sure plays an important role on my team. * Why it's of critical importance to exercise discipline, both before and after financial freedom. * In reality, how dividends are a bit more fluid in a more mature portfolio. As a dividend investor with over 20 years of experience and with over 30 positions in my portfolio, my dividends tend to stagger pretty well. Since different companies pay dividends different months, it all tends to even out. Mentioned in today's video, I'm now on Instagram. You can find me here. Reach out and ask a question! https://www.instagram.com/ianlopuch/ At the end of the day, I will never let dividend schedule dictate a holding. I only invest based on fundamentals, not payout schedule. Here's one of my videos on fundamental stock analysis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fDxYxsvPc_s This year, I'm buying KMB and PG. I don't even know their dividend schedules, I just know they pay quarterly. (After all, I invest for fundamentals, not payout schedules.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGRmIeiep1g Disclosure: I am long Kimberly-Clark (KMB) and Procter & Gamble (PG). I own both of these stocks in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 17165 ppcian
The Monthly DIVIDEND STOCK That I Own In My Stock Portfolio
 
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I invest for dividend income and cash flow. Today's video highlights a company I own in my personal stock portfolio that pays dividends on a monthly basis. I’m talking about the real estate investment trust (REIT) called Realty Income (O). Every single month, I receive a dividend payout from this stock, adding a lot of fluidity and predictability to my stream of passive income. While Realty Income is not a core position in my portfolio, it is definitely a solid medium position, and a component of my team that plays a key role. In fact, it's my only position that pays dividends on a monthly basis. At a high level, I love this company because they are shareholder friendly. They are in business to pay monthly dividends, and take a shareholder-first approach. Also, over the long term, Realty Income has handsomely beaten the S&P 500. When you look at its total return (capital appreciation and dividends), the S&P 500 has been left in the dust. While I invest for passive income (and beating the S&P 500 is not my primary concern), it's sure nice to have a stock with such a great track record. Lately, REITs (and utilities too) have faced some downward pressure. As interest rates increase, yield investors have other alternatives. Also, as interest rates increase, debt-reliant companies may face some pressure as they refinance their debt. It is my belief that any interest rate risk can be passed along to Realty Income's customers during lease renewal, but we shall see. In today's video, I cover a lot of ground: * What is Realty Income? * What do they do? How to triple net leases (NNN leases) work? * A look at Realty Income's impressive historical performance. * A look at some REIT-specific metrics such as years left on lease agreements, portfolio occupancy, and also funds from operation (FFO). (Perhaps my favorite part of the video.) * Some risk factors with Realty Income – interest rate risk and tenant churn risk. While today's video is a long one, I wanted to make sure to share insights on this stock because I receive so many questions here about my thoughts on monthly dividend payers. I also receive so many questions about real estate investment trusts (REITs). Today's video is sure to be a subscriber favorite! Want to connect with me? I'm now on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ianlopuch/ Want to learn more about my philosophy on monthly dividends? Today's video is actually part two of a two part series. Check out part one here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9wNZlxE78c Want to see my controversial video on how I tend to beat the S&P 500? Check it out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rhvz8-0TDY These days, I also like Southern Company (SO). Due to rising interest rates and some analyst downgrades, I believe it’s on sale. Learn more here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SW_jAVvhEqw Want to learn more about my 2018 dividend investing goals? Here you go: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGRmIeiep1g Disclosure: I am long Realty Income (O), Southern Company (SO), Kimberly-Clark (KMB), and Procter & Gamble (PG). I own all four of these stocks in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Also, I'm not a tax advisor and today's video is NOT tax advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 30653 ppcian
THE TOP 3 STOCKS I'M BUYING NOW (Investing In March & April of 2019)
 
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Today's #dividend #stock #investing video covers the three stocks I'm buying right now in March and April of 2019! I'm really excited about all three because they are all considered core positions (with the third, perhaps, sitting on the border between core and medium). Dividend Stock Pick 1: PepsiCo (PEP) * Trading at $121.89, towards a 5-year high. * Forward 2019 PE ratio of 22.12 (based on analyst estimates of 5.51 EPS). * NOT a value right now, but I'm buying to "bring it to size" in my portfolio. With current weight at 4.87%, I want to get my PEP stock weighting closer to 6-8% range. * 3% current dividend yield, but a great track record of increases. Last increase was a whopping 15%. Dividend Stock Pick 2: United Technologies (UTX) * Currently trading at $126.30, it's towards the top of the 5-year range. That said, the stock has not really gone anywhere in the last 5 years (a good thing for this investor). * Forward 2019 PE of 16.97 (based on analyst estimates of 7.91 EPS). * I believe many investors are overlooking this stock since it will split into three separate companies. I think a lot of investors are employing a "wait and see" approach, creating value for those that buy now (like myself). * Lower dividend yield of 2.3% with a lower dividend growth rate. (That said, a fabulous payout ratio.) Dividend Stock Pick 3: Cedar Fair (FUN) * Whopping 7% dividend yield. * Revenue is up, attendance is up, cash flow is up, debt coverage is up, and the stock is down! * Master limited partnership (MLP) has unique tax considerations. Based on my first FUN K-1, I now feel more confident to buy in smaller tranches. (Although, not too small.) * Trading at $53.14, towards the bottom of the 5-year range – yes! Let's connect on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ianlopuch Let's connect on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ianlopuch/ Want to learn more about PepsiCo, my #2 favorite stock of all time? Check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFjUoFWEC44 United Technologies (UTX) is my #4 favorite dividend stock of all time: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XV8Txpw-qHA I have been earning extra cash to invest by selling items on eBay: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxIhNcI9Ln8 Check out my detailed stock analysis of Cedar Fair (FUN): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhujBcrq8Xg Here are my thoughts about dividend investing and taxes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2y0CgkzgV6I It's important to be careful analyzing stocks based on GAAP earnings: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgVMtv3ns5c DISCLOSURE: I am long Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), BTI (BTI), Altria (MO), PepsiCo (PEP), United Technologies (UTX), and Cedar Fair (FUN). I own all of these stocks in my stock portfolio. DISCLAIMER: All information and data on my YouTube Channel, blog, email newsletters, white papers, Excel files, and other materials is solely for informational purposes. I make no representations as to the accuracy, completeness, suitability or validity of any information. I will not be liable for any errors, omissions, losses, injuries or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided AS IS with no warranties, and confers no rights. I will not be responsible for the accuracy of material that is linked on this site. Because the information herein is based on my personal opinion and experience, it should not be considered professional financial investment advice or tax advice. The ideas and strategies that I provide should never be used without first assessing your own personal/financial situation, or without consulting a financial and/or tax professional. My thoughts and opinions may also change from time to time as I acquire more knowledge. These are, as discussed above, solely my thoughts and opinions. I reserve the right to delete any comments for any reason (abusive in nature, contain profanity, etc.). Your continued reading/use of my YouTube Channel, blog, email newsletters, whitepapers, Excel files, and other materials constitutes your agreement with and acceptance of this disclaimer. COPYRIGHT: All PPC Ian videos, Excel files, guides, and other content are (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC. PPC Ian is a registered trademark (tm) of IJL Productions LLC
Views: 13897 ppcian
How To Invest In Dividend Stocks With DRIPs and DSPs (Dividend Reinvestment Plans)
 
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In the world of dividend investing and personal finance, I truly believe that dividend reinvestment plans (DRIPs) and direct stock purchase plans (DSPs) are incredibly underrated. While new technologies often get the spotlight, these old school stock investment vehicles are incredibly innovative, in my opinion. In today's video, learn why DRIPs can be beneficial for both new and seasoned dividend stock investors. And, learn how to get started! At the end of the day, I get a lot of questions here on my YouTube channel about fees and commissions. It seems like all investors want to minimize fees. I also receive questions about getting started. Many feel that they just don't have enough money to start investing in dividend stocks. In my opinion, dividend reinvestment plans remove all barriers. They reduce (and often eliminate) fees, while bringing accessibility to smaller investors. Today's video shares the pros and cons of dividend reinvestment plans! Some of the pros discussed include: * Holding stock in your name (versus the street name, in the case of a stock brokerage). * They can be free! In the case of General Mills, for example, their DRIP charges no fees for purchasing stock (other than the $15 1-time setup fee). * DRIPs make it easy to dollar cost average, one of my favorite investing strategies of all time. * DRIPs allow one to buy fractional shares, a critical component of my dividend investing strategy. (One is hard pressed to find other avenues that make it so easy to purchase fractional shares of stock.) * As the name implies, DRIPs allow one to reinvest their dividends, accelerating their portfolio value. * They keep one "in the game". * They are easy! Of course, there are some cons with DRIPs as well: * Trades can be (very) slow. If one needs to time the market, DRIPs are just not going to work well. By contrast, such plans are great for "buy and hold" long-term investors, like myself. * Fees can change over time. While a DRIP can be "free" right now, fees could pop up. It's important to watch the fee schedule very closely. * Bookkeeping is a bit more involved when one makes regular purchases and reinvests dividends. (This really pertains to the dividend growth investing strategy overall.) In my opinion, if more people knew about dividend reinvestment plans, they would not be so scared to start investing. Worth noting, today's video also goes into the specific example of General Mills (ticker: GIS). This DRIP, other than the $15 setup fee, changes no fees for buying stock nor reinvesting dividends. (All fees are paid by the company on behalf of the shareholders.) Run by EQ (formerly Wells Fargo Shareholder Services), General Mills is the poster child of a great dividend reinvestment plan. As mentioned in the video today, I recently purchased General Mills. Want to learn why? Here's my General Mills dividend stock analysis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z12Ac83Nz0Q Mentioned in today's video, here's one of my earlier videos on DRIPs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWdptrcEKGo Also mentioned, here's my "stay in the game" strategy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPQ3BQP0YFs And, here's how I personally reinvest my dividends: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zYjGs5rDMnw Want to reach out? Let's connect on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ianlopuch/ Disclosure: I am long General Mills (GIS). I own this stock in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Also, I'm not a tax advisor and today's video is NOT tax advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 6615 ppcian
Angel Investing: My Experience With SAFE Agreements and Convertible Notes
 
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In 2017, I placed three angel investments in early stage technology startups. It was my biggest year yet as an angel investor. I also gained extensive experience with SAFE Agreements (Simple Agreement For Future Equity) and Convertible Notes. Learn about my experience with angel investing, and learn all about SAFE Agreements and Convertible Notes. At a high level, I'm a cash flow investor at heart. And, I only allocate up to 10% of my portfolio for riskier investments like tech startups. However, I really value this 10% because I have not lost money yet on an angel investment, and it's a way to supercharge my returns. I can take profits from angel investments and reallocate to more traditional cash flow instruments. Today's video includes: * Definitions of SAFE Agreements and Convertible Notes. * Pros and Cons of SAFE Agreements and Convertible Notes. * The importance of timing and understanding when one's agreement will convert into real equity. * The importance of the discount factor, and getting rewarded for getting in early (during the friends and family round). * How valuation caps work and why they matter. * Why it's key to avoid SAFE Agreements and Convertible Notes that have a buy out clause. * The importance of performing extensive due diligence and looking at all numbers. (I avoid deals where I don't have access to numbers.) * What it means to be an accredited investor, and how angel investments are typically restricted to accredited investors. That being said, even if one cannot invest, it's never too early to start building one's network. As a closing thought, I love angel investing because it allows me to invest in my friends. It allows me to invest in dreams. That being said, I think some people get into angel investing for the wrong reasons. I keep my investments private (I typically don't list them online), since this is not a bragging competition. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 4963 ppcian
1 Dividend Stock Everyone HATES (That I Like)
 
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I'm thrilled to cover a stock that I personally own in my dividend stock portfolio. This is a dividend growth stock at multi-year lows. An out of favor stock sporting a strong (and growing) dividend yield, all of the analysts and media seem to hate this particular company (from an investing and personal finance standpoint). I'm talking about IBM. In today's video, learn why I personally own IBM for cash flow and dividends. Learn why I have averaged into this position, and especially like its increasing dividend. That being said, also learn why IBM is not a focus of mine in 2018, as it's not a "core holding" in my personal stock portfolio (mainly due to its heavy debt). Today's video covers: * Pros and cons of IBM as an investment, from a dividend investing standpoint. * Why I like to look at stocks that are "out of favor" with analysts. * PE ratio and why it's important to dividend investors. Learn about IBM's PE and how it's quite low compared to the overall market. * Dividend yield and payout ratio. (Both are really great for IBM, right now, in my opinion.) * Revenue and revenue growth trajectory (IBM might be turning the corner). * IBM's huge amount of debt (the biggest con with this stock and why it will not be a core position of mine). At a high level, also learn about my strategy of "painting with broad brush strokes". This strategy allows me to look 10, 20, or even 30 years out, while all of the analysts are looking at micro details from the last quarter. It's this very strategy that sets dividend investors in a league of their own, in my opinion. Want to learn more about PE ratio? Here's a video I produced on that very topic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUmgT75dBKI Want to learn more about my positions in Kimberly-Clark and Procter & Gamble? Check out this recent video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGRmIeiep1g Disclosure: I am long IBM (IBM), Kimberly-Clark (KMB), and Procter & Gamble (PG). I own all three of these stocks in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 8190 ppcian
How To Invest $5000 (Investing $5000 In The Stock Market)
 
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What if I had $5000 to invest in the stock market? What if I was just starting out, all over again, and wanted to invest my first $5000 in stocks? Today's video discusses this very hypothetical question, from a dividend growth investing perspective. Learn how I would personally invest five thousand dollars for passive income and cash flow. In particular, I would: (1) Buy three stocks, with roughly equal investments in each. Focus on three sectors: consumer non-cyclical food and beverage, consumer non-cyclical household products, and healthcare (pharmaceutical, medical devices, and household products). I love these sectors for the long-term because everyone needs these items in both good and bad economies. (2) Leverage dividend reinvestment plans (or DRIPs) for at least two of the three stocks. Open a low-cost brokerage account with dividend reinvestment for the third stock, if a no fee (or low fee) DRIP did not exist. (3) Make lump sum investments, however stagger my investments one month at a time. It would take three total months to deploy my $5000 in the stock market. (4) Reinvest all dividends, compounding my passive income portfolio over time. (Eventually, I would not reinvest dividends and would live off the cash flow. In the short and medium-term, however, I would reinvest dividends to fuel portfolio growth.) (5) Make periodic, ongoing investments. Since I would own three stocks, I would allocate capital to the one that has the most favorable valuation at the time of my purchase. (6) Focus on blue chip stocks with international exposure (including India and Africa). (7) Strive to purchase stocks with a long history of 7% year-over-year dividend growth. (8) Focus on stocks with payout ratios in the 50% range. (9) Focus on stocks with a starting yield in the 3% range (although anywhere from 2.0%-3.25% should do just fine). Let's assume for minute that I don't care about capital appreciation and these three stocks go nowhere over the next 30 years. Let's also assume I don't reinvest dividends (although that is not true). From a conservative modeling standpoint, my yield on cost would be 23% after 30 years. Meaning: I would receive $1,150 in dividend income each year for the rest of my life. That's a nice stream of cash flow for my $5000 initial investment. And, that's a really conservative model (in my opinion). Today's video highlights the power and beauty of dividend growth investing. Starting with just $5000 is a solid foundation and a great way to begin one's dividend stock journey. Please note that today's video builds on my last video about investing your first $1000: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iijz-5vGSh0 If you're researching stock brokers for dividend growth investing, you may want to check out this recent video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcuXZauMwZk Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions.
Views: 14751 ppcian
An UNDERVALUED Stock That Yields Over 5% (A Dividend Stock I Own)
 
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Today, I want to discuss a dividend stock that I personally own, a utility that is on sale. After several analyst downgrades, this stock has fallen by 15% in just a few months. And, its starting dividend yield is 5.27% (an incredible dividend yield in today's stock market). I'm talking about Southern Company (ticker SO). Today's video covers Southern Company and the utility sector in general from a variety of angles, all through the lens of a dividend investor. * Learn about SO's dividend growth history. I'm really loving the dividend increases (much higher than I would have expected for a utility). * Learn about Southern Company's attractive PE ratio. While it's not a deep discount, the current PE ratio is reasonable for this market. And, learn why online data sources seem to have SO's PE all wrong. * See my modeling and why I think that SO's yield on cost could be 7% ten years from now. * See my discussion of Southern Company's rapid revenue growth, due to acquisitions. * Some think that they have to invest in growth stocks to beat the S&P 500. Learn how SO has doubled the performance of the S&P 500 since 1996. * Understand how SO fits into my personal dividend stock portfolio. While I see SO as a value, it's not a core position. Rather, it's a medium position. I will be averaging in and building my position here. That said, it will not be my core focus this year. * Learn about regulated utilities and how regulation creates a monopoly of sorts. For this reason, I really like the utility sector. * See why there may be continued opportunity to average down as interest rates increase. Utilities carry interest rate sensitivity. Also mentioned in today's video, I'm buying Kimberly Clark (KMB) and Procter & Gamble (PG) in my dividend stock portfolio in 2018. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGRmIeiep1g Also mentioned in today's video, I am a big fan of PE ratio. Learn why PE ratio is critical to my dividend investing strategy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUmgT75dBKI Last, I am sharing some really great knowledge on social media. Find my on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/ianlopuch/ Disclosure: I am long Southern Company (SO), Kimberly-Clark (KMB), and Procter & Gamble (PG). I own all three of these stocks in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 13581 ppcian
Do I TRUST Wall St. Analysts For My Dividend Investing Decisions? (You Guess)
 
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Who are these Wall Street Analysts who determine whether a stock is a buy, hold, or sell? Who are they to set price targets and say a particular stock is worth a certain share price? As a dividend growth investor with a very long-term time horizon, I have some unique thoughts on Wall Street Analysts. Learn today what I think about analyst reports, and why I believe dividend investors are in a league of their own. Today's video covers: * The difference between buy side and sell side analysts, and why I believe that buy side analyst reports are more helpful. Buy side analysts generate reports that are used by their firm's mutual fund managers to make actual decisions, while sell side analysts are mainly developing reports to attract new business to a particular firm. * My favorite thing about analysts: They can sometimes create great buying opportunities in my favorite dividend stocks! If a stock I love gets downgraded, the stock price will often fall. I think of this as a gift from the analysts, and like to take advantage of such buying opportunities (as long as long-term company fundamentals have not changed). * Why dividend investors are in a league of their own. Analysts are focused on the short term (the next few years). Dividend investors are focused on decades upon decades. Dividend investing is such a foreign concept to most, and it's my opinion that dividend investors should do their own analysis. Sure, it's ok to look at the analyst reports to verify one's own work, but it's always important to formulate one's own investment strategy. * Why it's important to stay focused on the long-term, and avoid the temptation to get caught up in the short-term. Short-term analyst calls can sometimes create distractions for the long-term dividend investor. Thanks so much for watching my fun personal finance video, filmed from beautiful San Francisco, California. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
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